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Cuisine On Tour: Japan

Global Feature
#0899
By: Andrea Lynn
Cuisine On Tour: Japan

Adding a little Japanese creativity into your cooking is more simple than it sounds. While one of the most common Japanese foods is sushi, its preparation—especially finding fresh, sushi-grade fish—can be difficult to pull off on your own. Yet there are other ways to bring the flavors of Japan into your kitchen with items like extracrispy panko breadcrumbs and toasted sesame seeds. Below are four ideas to help add a little Asian inspiration to your meals.

Tempura

Tempura is a popular light, crispy coating on shrimp, chicken or vegetable pieces that is deep-fried to golden perfection. To make a tempura base, simply follow the directions in this recipe showcasing vegetables like zucchini, carrots, onions, and mushrooms. When the oil is heated, coat the items individually in the tempura batter and fry in a deep fryer or a wok filled with hot oil until done, just a few minutes.

Japanese-Style Pork

Another Japanese tradition is to coat thin slices of meat, such as pork, with panko breadcrumbs and fry until crispy. To accomplish this, use boneless pork cutlets and make a dipping station of cornstarch, whisked eggs and panko breadcrumbs, like Savory Pretzel Crunchy Panko. One at a time, dip each pork piece into cornstarch, egg and breadcrumbs before adding into a sauté pan filled at least 1 inch high with canola oil until golden and crisp, a few minutes per side. Don't want to use pork? Follow the same instructions using chicken or veal cutlets.

Japanese (Salad) Dressing

Bring a touch of Japan to any dish in the form of this dressing. In a small bowl, mix together equal portions of honey, soy sauce and sesame oil (such as 1 tablespoon each). Add double the amount of canola or olive oil (like 2 tablespoons, in this case), along with as many toasted sesame seeds as desired. Whisk together and use this on a variety of dishes: a cucumber salad; a rice bowl with carrots, scallions and chicken; or a host of Japanese noodles, like udon, soba or rice noodles.

Glazed Fish

Embrace fish as a staple of your diet, as the Japanese do, by tweaking the glaze in this salmon recipe and add it to your regular dinner repertoire. Replace the orange juice concentrate with soy sauce. Broil or grill, as the recipe directs, then sprinkle with a combination of sesame seeds and chopped scallions once the fish is cooked. Use this glaze on any type of fish, like tilapia fillets or tuna steaks, or even as a marinade and then glaze for chicken breasts.

Andrea Lynn is a recipe developer and cookbook author, most recently of the culinary guidebook/cookbook, Queens: A Culinary Passport.

Spice Islands® spices deliver high quality, authentic flavors from all over the world so you can put the most delicious meals on your table.

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